• Supreme Court restricts police on cellphone location data

    2 monthes ago - By Reuters

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a major victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities.
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  • In major privacy win, US Supreme Court says cops need warrant to access cell phone location

    2 monthes ago - By Marketing Land

    The decision imposes Fourth Amendment restrictions on the ability to conduct surveillance without probable cause.
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  • SCOTUS Rules Warrantless Phone Location Data Requests Illegal

    2 monthes ago - By Android Headlines

    In a five-to-four vote cast earlier today, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that most warrantless smartphone location data requests are illegal, throwing out a previous verdict from the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals and providing digital privacy advocates with a major win. SCOTUS hence put an official end to Carpenter v. the U.S., a highly polarizing case that stems back from 2011 when one Timothy Carpenter was charged with a series of armed robberies performed in Ohio and Michigan in late 2010 and early 2011 based on handset location data the FBI obtained without a...
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  • Justices adopt digital-age privacy rules to track cellphones

    2 monthes ago - By Phys.org

    The Supreme Court ruled Friday that police generally need a search warrant if they want to track criminal suspects' movements by collecting information about where they've used their cellphones, bolstering privacy interests in the digital age.
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  • Supreme Court rules cops need warrant to obtain location data generated by your phone

    Supreme Court rules cops need warrant to obtain location data generated by your phone

    2 monthes ago - By Phone Arena

    The Supreme Court, by a 5-4 vote, ruled that police need a search warrant to obtain location data generated by a cellphone over a period of time. The ruling says that collecting this data from wireless providers without a warrant violates the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which guards against unreasonable search and seizure. Conservative Chief Justice John Roberts joined with the four liberals on the court to write the prevailing decision.
    The ruling is limited to cell-site location data. Whether cops need a warrant to see the real time location of a criminal ...
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  • Carpenter v. United States Decision Strengthens Digital Privacy

    2 monthes ago - By Wired

    Thanks to Carpenter v. United States, the government will now generally need a warrant to obtain your cell site location information.
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  • US Supreme Court says no to warantless location searches

    2 monthes ago - By WMPoweruser

    The Supreme court has just delivered a new judgement that prohibits warrantless seizure of location records by the police. The case, Carpenter v. United States was decided on 5 - 4 margin, a slim one, om the issue of whether a user could expect a reasonable expectation of privacy regarding location records held by a third party. This would trigger fourth...
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  • Should Law Enforcement Need a Warrant to Track Your Cell Phone?

    2 monthes ago - By Scientific American

    In Carpenter v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court is about to tackle its biggest case related to the Fourth Amendment and privacy of data generated by cell phones
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  • Supreme Court rules that police need warrants to get phone location info

    Supreme Court rules that police need warrants to get phone location info

    2 monthes ago - By Windows Central

    The decision was ruled in favor with a 5-4 vote.
    The United States Supreme Court issued a ruling on June 22 stating that police must first get an official warrant before they can use cell tower data to track someone's location.
    This ruling comes from the Carpenter v. United States case that dates back six years to 2011. Timothy Carpenter was arrested for a robbery in Detroit during that year, but only after police tracked down 12,898 locations of Carpenter over the course of 127 days. However, the police obtained all this data without any sort of warrant.
    With the June 22 decision from the...
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  • Get a warrant before tracking cell phone users, Supreme Court rules in privacy win

    Get a warrant before tracking cell phone users, Supreme Court rules in privacy win

    2 monthes ago - By Digital Trends

    The Supreme Court determined that police departments across the nation must first attain a search warrant before tracking mobile device users. This decision could have enormous implications.
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  • Supreme Court says police need a warrant for historical cell location records

    2 monthes ago - By ZDnet

    The case was one of the long-awaited privacy legal decisions of the year.
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  • Supreme Court decision requires warrant to obtain cellphone records for tracking

    2 monthes ago - By TechCrunch

    The United States Supreme court issued a decision this morning required police to obtain a warrant from a judge in order to track individuals through cellphone records. The 5-4 ruling is being regarded as a win for privacy advocates in the U.S.
    The decision derived from a 2011 case in which FBI agents used three months of phone records in order to capture and convict a Michigan man of robbing Radio Shack and T-Mobile locations. The suspect's lawyers argued that the evidence should be thrown out due to a lack of warrant, after their client lost in lower court rulings.
    Chief Justice John...
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  • Supreme Court Says Warrant Required for Cell-Based Location Searches

    2 monthes ago - By Phone Scoop

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that law enforcement must generally obtain a search warrant in order to track people via cell phone towers. The 5-4 ruling sided with the defendant in a case where police discovered a suspect's whereabouts through cell phone records without first getting a warrant. The Supreme Court said gathering location data from wireless carriers without a warrant fits the definition of unreasonable search and seizure, a violation of the Fourth Amendment. "The Fourth Amendment protects not only property interests but certain expectations of privacy as well," read the...
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  • Supreme Court ruling requires search warrant for phone location data

    2 monthes ago - By Engadget

    The Supreme Court has ruled that to perform cellphone tower searches, police will now need a search warrant, as spotted by NPR. Meaning, that now for law enforcement to track where you've been, via historical cellphone location data, will requi...
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  • Supreme Court rules warrants required for cellphone location data

    2 monthes ago - By Reuters

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities.
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  • Supreme Court says warrant necessary for phone location data - CNET

    2 monthes ago - By CNET

    US justices say law enforcement needs a warrant to follow your digital footprint.
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  • Supreme Court decides against warrantless location searches in a major privacy decision

    Supreme Court decides against warrantless location searches in a major privacy decision

    2 monthes ago - By The Verge

    In a major decision on privacy in the digital age, the Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 ruling today that police must obtain a warrant to obtain cellphone location records.
    The case, Carpenter v. United States , has been closely watched for its Fourth Amendment implications, and centered on whether there was a reasonable expectation of privacy when location records were hold by a third party.
    The court ruled 5-4
    “Given the unique nature of cell phone location records, the fact that the information is held by a third party does not by itself overcome the user's claim to Fourth Amendment...
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